Our People

Our People

At BMT we can have a positive impact on the environment beyond the projects we deliver and the offices we visit. Here we share how our employees have been having a positive impact on the environment. You may learn some useful hints and tips so that you can get involved at home!

Our People

Amanda Maxemchuk

Reducing food footprint

Amanda Maxemchuk

Reducing food footprint

At BMT we can have a positive impact on the environment beyond the projects we deliver and the offices we visit. Here we share how our employees have been having a positive impact on the environment. You may learn some useful hints and tips so that you can get involved at home!

Jim Moran

Encouraging Monarch butterlies

Jim Moran

Encouraging Monarch butterlies

We wanted to encourage the migration of pollinators and Monarch butterflies by providing milkweed plants to host feeding, egg laying, and caterpillar feeding.  We grow and maintain stands of milkweed for the Monarch butterflies. Milkweed planted was Asclepius Tuberosa and Asclepius Incarnata which are perennial and return every year. This has been very successful with Monarchs being seen near the milkweed and Monarch caterpillars being found. We established three separate milkweed patches, one only about four feet square, and had caterpillars on all three locations. We also disseminated milkweed plants to BMT employees who planted their own patches.

Cho Wutyi Thin

Reducing single-use plastics

Cho Wutyi Thin

Reducing single-use plastics

During the pandemic, lots of single-use plastic waste has been generated from takeaway food outlets in Singapore, following the closure of dine-in cafes and restaurants. I am very committed to reducing single-use plastics such as disposable containers and plastic cutlery. I believe using containers and bottles when purchasing takeaway meals is one part we can all play to help build a greener and more sustainable environment.

Karen Arsenault

Introducing a bees nest

Karen Arsenault

Introducing a bees nest

I recently bought a bees nest on Amazon, it is made in Canada and will benefit my garden – year after year. Solitary bees are so important as they provide plant pollination for our gardens both flowers and vegetables, but their numbers are declining due to a loss of suitable nesting locations. Buying this nest is one way we can help improve our environment! It is very inexpensive to buy and locate in your yard, providing a safe place for the bees to lay their eggs, helping to boost the local population of these beneficial, nonaggressive bees.

Jennie Hudson

Re-usable face wipes

Jennie Hudson

Re-usable face wipes

To reduce waste at home I have made some reusable face wipes -made from cotton fabric and terry toweling. This means I no longer throw away cotton wool each day as these can be washed and used again. I also make beeswax wraps out of cotton fabric, and beeswax. These can be used in place of clingfilm and are reusable, so avoid plastic waste. I had so many compliments on them that I started to make them to sell, helping others be more sustainable!

Bhavdip Shah

Re-usable bags

Bhavdip Shah

Re-usable bags

Since the pandemic started we mostly order groceries online. When the order is delivered to our home, we always make sure that we use our own reusable bags and boxes to collect the shopping from the delivery vehicle - the same way you take reusable bags market shopping. I believe this small act helps to reduce plastic bags and contributes to creating a more sustainable environment.

Gregory Jose

Food re-distribution

Gregory Jose

Food re-distribution

My spouse and I enjoy cooking at home but are concerned about the amount of food waste generated. To that end, we subscribe to a food redistribution service called Hungry Harvest where 'rejected food' (i.e. irregular sizes) are sent to us. I would call this '"ugly food" but they taste fine! Also, we freeze perishables (like lemons) to extend their lifespans and use in the future.

Richard Celotto

Reducing landfill footprint

Richard Celotto

Reducing landfill footprint

My family started composting last year to reduce our landfill footprint. We purchased a Dual Chamber Tumbling Composter (pictured) to help break down food waste into compost for use in the yard. We also switched to an organic lawn treatment company that's better for the environment.

Kevin Bozowskyj

Net-zero for 30 years

Kevin Bozowskyj

Net-zero for 30 years

After replacing our oil burning water heater with an electric hot water tank, we had 27 solar panels fitted to the roof which should provide enough power for us to be net-zero for at least the next 30 years. Bring on the sun!!

Aaron Gill

Reducing energy bills

Aaron Gill

Reducing energy bills

There are multiple “greener home” initiatives in Canada that residents can take advantage of to upgrade their homes to be more energy efficient. I recently had an energy assessment conducted of my home, which recommended changes I could make to improve its efficiency. Particularly in areas of heat and air loss. By making these upgrades (such as air sealing and insulation), the Canadian government will provide a rebate to offset the total cost for implementation. At the same time I enjoy a reduction in my energy bills, which means less of a carbon footprint.

Cari Beard

Leaving no trace

Cari Beard

Leaving no trace

I love the outdoors with my friends and we are always very conscious about ‘leaving no trace’ and picking up litter on our adventures. I particularly love being in and on the water. I kayak with friends here in Kingston upon Thames, on other rivers, and the sea and where we can, we always try and pick up rubbish in the water or that has got stuck in the bushes and trees along the way. The picture is of me on the Thames in Kingston upon Thames checking the edges out.

Bianca Vickers

Tracking carbon footprint

Bianca Vickers

Tracking carbon footprint

Last year, I was introduced to TreeApp. They enable people to plant one tree for free each day simply by helping organisations spread the word about their sustainable products and services. It helps us track our carbon footprint and how much is absorbed by the trees we plant. So far, I've planted 135 trees in several different countries, supporting their reforestation projects.

Mark Sullivan

Letting the lawn go wild

Mark Sullivan

Letting the lawn go wild

I have left the lawn to go wild in 'no mow May' to encourage the bees in their early honey making season - they thrive off of the wild flowers. I also use eco-friendly cleaning products with a reduced plastic footprint and recycle ink cartridges, that have automatically monitored use - reducing ink waste and plastic use.

Jane Butler

Choosing bee friendly plants

Jane Butler

Choosing bee friendly plants

I try to encourage and welcome bees into the garden by choosing bee-friendly plants and flowers, such as this hardy geranium which really attracts them at this time of year.

Richard Chalker

Re-filling containers

Richard Chalker

Re-filling containers

Where possible we try to shop as environmentally friendly and ethical as possible, often using local independent shops. We have a local zero waste shop where we take our empty containers to refill with all of our basic non-perishable goods. This helps us avoid unnecessary single use plastic waste.

Guy Tomlinson

Recycling coffee pods

Guy Tomlinson

Recycling coffee pods

Recycling Nespresso coffee pods.

Will Pope

Home composting

Will Pope

Home composting

We've made a few changes over the past year to have a positive impact including digging a wildlife pond, installing a water butt and replacing the double glazing in the house. 1 year ago I also made a home compost bin, and after turning it in May, this is the result! Fresh, nutrient-rich compost that I've just used to pot up my tomatoes.

Ian Duncan

Vehicle to grid trial

Ian Duncan

Vehicle to grid trial

Not a very exciting photo but quite a clever box! I am taking part in a Vehicle to Grid (V2G) trial with my Electric Vehicle (EV). When I get home in the evening and plug my car in to recharge the box exports my battery to the national grid and my utility company pay me a premium price. It then automatically recharges my vehicle using less expensive off peak electricity. This helps smooth out the demand on the grid and saves me money!

Johanna Probert

Collecting rain water

Johanna Probert

Collecting rain water

We have a small but rather thirsty garden. With being on a water meter, we installed a water butt on our downpipe to collect rain water and haven't had to use tap water so far this year.

Am Conway

Upcycling furniture

Am Conway

Upcycling furniture

When I have the chance, I will be 'upcycling' my daughters dinosaur bookcase - she is now 11 years old, so she no longer needs it! It will be planted with herbs as a present to my husband, who loves to cook. Before I throw anything away, I try to make a conscious effort to conserve the environment. Upcycling reduces the amount of waste that is dumped in landfills.

Simon Gould

Encouraging biodiversity

Simon Gould

Encouraging biodiversity

As a Parish Councillor, I've been promoting activities in my village to encourage biodiversity. One example has been to 're-wild' green spaces to allow insects and bugs space to thrive and, especially, to encourage more bees to the area.

James Allen

Heating hot water

James Allen

Heating hot water

We have recently had a Solar Thermal System installed on our roof, which uses the sun to heat the hot water we need for our house, therefore reducing the need to use gas to fuel our boiler to heat our water normally. Even on a cloudy day, the panel will still provide some pre-heating to the water, which reduces the work the boiler has to do to bring it up to temperature, and therefore using less gas overall. Although it's only a small thing, it feels great to know we're reducing the use of fossil fuels and harnessing green energy!

Andrew Harris

Sustainably managing IT assets

Andrew Harris

Sustainably managing IT assets

I've started an initiative within DAS Australia to look at how we sustainably manage our IT assets. We're considering how to define when IT is unsupportable or beyond economic repair, with the aim of running our assets as long as possible rather than a maximum refresh life. When things do break, how do we dispose of them? Are there recyclers who can minimise the disposal impact? For items that still work, we might gift them to staff or charities if security concerns can be addressed. Much more to think about, so please watch this space!

Beth Toki

Re-purposing branded clothing

Beth Toki

Re-purposing branded clothing

On noticing an excess of old work uniforms in my wardrobe, I organised a ‘Uniform Muster’ for our Brisbane office this year, collecting old BMT business shirts, high-vis safety shirts, and safety trousers for the responsible re-purposing of our unused and pre-loved corporate uniforms. Several uniforms found new homes with recent staff recruits, with the remainder being collected by a via textile recycling provider. Textile recycling helps keep unwanted post-consumer textiles and apparel out of landfill. Recycled textiles can be used to make products such as recycled yarn and fabric, carpets, carpet underlays, floor matting, insulation and blankets.

Chelly Litster

Growing fruit and veg

Chelly Litster

Growing fruit and veg

We built a 25x10 metre enclosure with 10 fruit trees and 9 vegetable areas made from repurposed storage tanks. We run a 5.7Kw solar system to power the sheds and house. We also have 7 rainwater tanks that collect up to 200,000 litres of rainwater from our shed surfaces.

Chris Shearer

Using less energy

Chris Shearer

Using less energy

With most of 2020 spent working from home and 4+ months in hard lockdown, my attention turned to home energy efficiency for my 1905 house in Melbourne, with the aim of using less energy to make the house comfortable to live in (and save money). I've draft-proofed cracks, upgraded the ceiling insulation, installed solar panels on the roof, am using our reverse cycle air conditioners for heating when needed (rather than gas ducted), and will be upgrading our windows to double glazed panels. Feels good to be walking a little lighter (from a sustainability perspective) on our planet.

Charles Lim

Switching off air con

Charles Lim

Switching off air con

Located at the equator, Singapore is hot and humid all year round. The heat is often inversely proportional to productivity hence it is important to wear light clothing when appropriate thus removing the need for an energy-hungry HVAC system while working at home. Air-conditioning does provide comfort and is a necessity at times, however, it also contributes to the urban heat island effect because the energy required is generated from fossil fuels (90% from LNG in Singapore), exacerbating global warming further.